If you are you thinking about getting a tattoo? If so, you’re not alone; according to a 2018 report from the Pew Research Center, almost 40% of Americans have at least one tattoo. And if you’re still on the fence about whether or not to get inked, you’re probably wondering about the difference between black and gray tattoos vs ┬ácolor tattoos. Here’s a short overview of each type of tattoo to help you decide which is right for you.

Black and Gray Tattoos

Black and gray tattoos are just what they sound like: Tattoos that are done in black ink with varying shades of gray to create a three-dimensional effect. This type of tattoo is often referred to as a “classic” tattoo, and it’s popular among men and women. Black and gray tattoos can be done in various styles, from photorealistic portraits to more abstract designs.

If you’re considering getting a black and gray tattoo, there are a few things to remember. First, this type of tattoo requires frequent touch-ups; because the ink is only one color, it tends to fade faster than tattoos that are done in multiple colors. Second, black and gray tattoos can be more painful to get than color tattoos; because the ink is darker, it requires more passes through the skin to achieve the desired effect. Finally, black and gray tattoos can be more expensive than color tattoos; because they require more time and effort to complete, they typically cost more money.

Color Tattoos

Color tattoos are just what they sound like: tattoos done in multiple colors. This type of tattoo is becoming increasingly popular, especially among millennials; according to one study, nearly 60% of millennials say they would consider getting a color tattoo. Color tattoos can be done in any style imaginable, from photorealistic portraits to more abstract designs. And because there are no limits on color selection, color tattoos can be customized to fit your personality perfectly.

If you’re considering getting a color tattoo, there are a few things to remember. First, while color tattoos require touch-ups, they don’t need to be done as frequently as black and gray; because the ink is lighter, it fades slower than in darker colors. Second, while color tattoos can be painful, they typically aren’t as painful as black and gray tattoos; because the ink is lighter, it doesn’t require as many passes through the skin to achieve the desired effect. Finally, color tattoos are less expensive than black and grey tattoos.

Conclusion

The decision of whether to get a black and gray tattoo or a color tattoo ultimately comes down to personal preference. If you want a classic tattoo that lasts longer without touch-ups, then a black and gray tattoo may be right. But if you want a brighter and more colorful tattoo, then a color tattoo may be right for you. Ultimately, the decision is yours!